Girls' POV Short Film Program at New York International Children's Film Festival

Still from Amelia's Closet (2016), directed by Halima Lucas, a short film premiering in the Girls' POV program at NYICFF.

Still from Amelia's Closet (2016), directed by Halima Lucas, a short film premiering in the Girls' POV program at NYICFF.

Think back to the movies you watched as a kid. When did you first experience a spark of recognition in a story on film? I distinctly remember the childhood thrill of watching the 1993 adaptation of The Secret Garden and identifying with its girl protagonist. Not only did the character of Mary Lennox change the lives of those around her, she also came from India. As a nine year old with an Indian father, that meant the world to me (British colonialism be damned). 

Flash forward to 2017. The media landscape encountered by tween and teen girls makes the entertainment options available in the 90s seem laughably innocent. I would venture a guess that the ratio of Kylie Jenner Instagram posts to movies like Brave and Moana is 1,000:1. In the age of Instagram, positive representation and the telling of identifiable girl's stories is of paramount importance.

If you are a parent in or near New York City, New York International Children's Film Festival (now celebrating its 20th  year and running through March 19th) offers your children an opportunity to celebrate what it means to be a girl in 2017. The Girls' POV short film program celebrates female perspectives from around the world. While most screenings are sold out, there are still tickets available for the March 11th screening at Scandinavia House

Expect me to be first in line at the screenings when my daughter turns 10 in 2025. By then, we'll be yearning for the good old days when we only had to worry about Snapchat and Instagram instead of augmented and virtual reality. 

We are thrilled to present a program that includes male and female directors sharing their unique creative perspectives in equal balance. Since 1999, NYICFF’s Girls’ POV short film program has focused on presenting female perspectives and wonderfully diverse female protagonists; what started as a reaction to the lack of authentic representation of girls and women in mainstream media has turned into a true celebration across our entire program.
— Nina Guralnick, Executive Director